The Second Crusade

June 5, 2012 | In: World War I


After the First Crusade, things remained calm for almost half a century. But the Muslims didn’t think the same. They began preparing retaking the Holy Land long before the Second Crusade. And so, in 1149, the Pope sent more troops to defeat those who still pose a threat to Jerusalem.

With the Pope’s help, large armies from England, France, Germany and other nations marched towards Constantinopole. Many soldiers were keeping a sword in their hands for the first time and most of their leaders were made so only for this battle. So, you can imagine what lay ahead. On the way, they planned the coming invasion and destroyed the armies from the past year. Their main objective was to provide Jerusalem with reinforcements, because most of the knights died in the First Crusade.

But with the state the army was in, it’s not hard to believe the Second Crusade was a failure. But that was not the main reason.

The armies were led by two kings. Unfortunately for them, they didn’t speak very well with each other. While one of them attacked the Turks capital, the other one attacked another target. This permitted the Turks to march from one place to another without much effort. The first was defeated and almost killed. The other one managed to keep his army alive longer, but ultimately he was also destroyed.

The Second Crusade was not only a lost battle. In fact, after it, the Pope had a clear sign of the decay of the Crusaders States in the East. Soon after, Jerusalem was weakly protected, and that only resulted in preparing the Third Crusade.

 

 


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