The American Car

July 4, 2012 | In: Car History


Although all across America manufacturers like Ransome Olds or Henry Ford manage to produce an important amount of automobiles, the car was considered to a luxurious object and not a necessity.

The real beginning of the American modern automobile started after the Second World War, when veterans coming back from the battlefield demanded strong and beautiful cars. But until 1948, the manufacturers didn’t have anything interesting for them. But Cadillac came with the first tailfins on the rear fenders. Not many years passed, and all manufacturers copied the design. General Motors came with the V8 engine in 1949. Chevrolet didn’t use the V8 until 1955, the same year Plymouth installed the Hemi V8 from Dodge.

In 1953, Chevrolet gave to the Americans their first sports car, the Corvette, but with a slow engine. But in 1955, the Corvette was equipped with 265 CID V8. In the same year, Ford came out with a rival for the Corvette, the Thunderbird.

The muscle car era begins in the early 60s, when almost every company started to make bigger and more powerful engines. In 1964, Pontiac came out with the Grand Prix to compete with the Thunderbird.

In the late 60s the population started to move from the cities to the suburbs and the car became a necessity. That is when the Eisenhower’s Interstate Highway System was created, becoming the greatest high-speed road network in the world. And with that out of the way, the car became a way of life, and not just a way to get from one point to another.


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